REVIEW: Medusa (Q Matchbox)

October 27, 2018
[Reclaiming Female Rage] Smashing all my preconceptions of what theatre and the mythological story of Medusa are about, co-creators Nisha Madhan, Julia Croft, and Virginia Frankovich have created an aural, visceral and mind-blowing ‘out-of-this-world’ theatrical experience.  There were no snakes in this production, no monstrous females, no men being turned into stone — but there was a lot of female […]

REVIEW: Your Heart Looks Like a Vagina (The Basement)

April 17, 2018
[No End in Sight] “It began with a pain in the neck, like I’d slept funny, a joke compared with what’s to come…” Your Heart Looks Like a Vagina is an autobiographical theatre show and a lyrical journey through Dominic “Tourettes” Hoey’s experience with developing and living with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). AS is a form of arthritis that over time […]

REVIEW: Fuck Rant (Auckland Fringe)

February 22, 2018
[Fuck Yeah] When I think of theatre company The Town Centre, the link from the agora (where the Ancient Greek public assembled for discussion) to the Theatre of Dionysus (where tragedians addressed social and political issues through mimetic representation) is unavoidable. So too are the words of Aristotle’s Poetics, where the rules to poetic writing were first composed. Over two thousand […]

REVIEW: Power Ballad (Zanetti Productions)

June 13, 2017
[Charged Space] For those that have seen Julia Croft in If There’s Not Dancing in the Revolution, Then I’m Not Coming, you can think of Power Ballad as its angrier, less-forgiving sister.  Back again after its season in the Auckland Fringe (reviewed by Nathan Joe), Power Ballad is fundraising to go all the way to the Edinburgh Fringe. It is intentionally difficult to […]

REVIEW: Power Ballad (Auckland Fringe)

March 9, 2017
[Language Games] Julia Croft’s If There’s Not Dancing at the Revolution, Then I’m Not Coming used feminist film theorist Laura Mulvey as the jumping off point for a riotous deconstruction of female representation in our popular media. It put those common tropes we often take for granted under a critical lens and scrutinised the hell out of them, all while […]

REVIEW: The Elephant Thief (Indian Ink)

June 20, 2016
[Stealing the Show] One good reason to appreciate Indian Ink is that they are an established theatre company that take genuine risks in their work while cohesively maintaining a focus towards the longevity of their art. This is by no means a simple or easy achievement. To refrain from resting on artistic laurels requires exploration into new and sometimes unsuccessful territory, which can […]

REVIEW: Young & Hungry 2015: The 21st Narcissus and 7500 Days (The Basement)

October 13, 2015
[by Matt Baker] Stumblr Based on last year’s Young & Hungry plays, it would be within reason to expect a 21st Century Narcissus to modernise the Greek myth through the complexities and perils of today’s youth’s navigation of online platforms. For Sam Brooks’ 21st Narcissus, it would also, however, be wrong. Unlike Uncle Minotaur, where mythology was ingrained in the narrative, […]

REVIEW: Kiss the Fish (Indian Ink Theatre Company)

September 15, 2013
A fish worth kissing [by Sharu Delilkan] The foyer of Q Theatre was like a Who’s Who of Auckland’s theatre industry last night – alive with anticipation of Indian Ink Theatre Company’s opening night of Kiss the Fish. Just like the masks that are used in the majority of Indian Ink’s shows, where no two are alike, we knew we […]

REVIEW: Cowboy Mouth & Love It Up

September 14, 2012
A Bittersweet Mouthful [by Matt Baker] Cowboy Mouth was once described as co-writer Sam Shephard’s ‘most thinly-veiled autobiography.’ However, his resultant abandonment of the production prior to the second night’s performance (he starred alongside his co-writer and lover at the time, Patti Smith) indicates that perhaps the piece was less of a thin veil, and more of a deluge of emotionally […]
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